Nov
28
Vegucation: Bell Pepper

Bell peppers are actually a fruit, but widely considered a vegetable. Although they are called peppers, they contain no capsaicin, which is what gives peppers their spice. Their array of different colors and flavors make it one versatile food that fits into many different cuisines.

Why are they beneficial?

Bell peppers are full of immune boosting vitamins like A and C. Red, orange, and yellow bell peppers have the most vitamin A content. They are also high in B vitamins that will give you energy. One bell pepper only contains about 37 calories and 8 percent of your daily fiber intake, so they make a great food for weight loss.

When are they in season?

You can find bell peppers in the summer and fall. The length of the season depends on weather, but they are around for a good portion of the year.

How long will they keep?

Bell peppers will last a few days in the refrigerator. You can also slice them up and freeze them to use in cooking. Freezing preserves the nutritional value in the peppers.

How do I prepare them?

You can eat bell peppers raw or cooked. Raw peppers make a great snack with hummus or tzatziki dip or on a sandwich. Here are some ways to eat them cooked:

  • Stuff them with ricotta and spinach or ground beef, tomatoes, and lettuce. Roast in the oven at 350 degrees. You could even crack an egg in the pepper for a healthy breakfast.
  • Slice them and sauté with chicken and taco seasoning for a fajita style dinner.
  • Sauté sliced pepper with broccoli and serve with a poached egg and brown rice.

 

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Meet the Author

Rachel

Rachel Howard

Rachel is studying to become a registered dietician at UTC. She believes eating real food is the key to a healthy lifestyle, and loves to teach others about nutrition. Rachel enjoys planning healthy and tasty meals and experimenting in the kitchen with new recipes. She likes the challenge of trying to make classic family recipes healthier or learning new cooking techniques.