Dec
13
Vegucation: Poblano Peppers

poblanos

 

Poblano peppers contain some capsaicin (the molecule that makes peppers spicy), but so little that they are less hot than a jalapeño pepper. Their smoky flavor goes with a variety of dishes, and they even have some amazing health benefits that may surprise you.

 

 

 

Why are they beneficial?

One poblano pepper contains more B2 (riboflavin) than an egg, which is known for its B vitamin content. Riboflavin has been shown to fight against cancer cells and is needed to make glutathione, another antioxidant. Capsaicin has also been shown to protect against cancerous cells. Even though poblanos don’t have much, there is still enough to reap the benefits. Capsaicin can also help you lose weight. It supports a fast metabolism, lower fat percentage, and a good blood lipid profile.

When are they in season?

Poblanos grow best in cooler temperatures, so they are abundant in the fall, winter, and spring.

How long will they keep?

Just like a bell pepper, they are best if kept in the refrigerator. However, the flavor will be best when eaten fresh. You can also chop up your poblano and freeze it to add to soups and sauces later.

How can I prepare them?

Poblano peppers add a kick to any dish. Here are a few ideas for incorporating them into your diet:

  • Add diced pepper to your chili or black bean soup.
  • Add them to pasta sauce for a little more spice.
  • You can stuff them with ground beef, corn, and tomatoes and bake in the oven until wilted.
  • Roast them and make your own salsa
  •  Sauté them with bell peppers, onions, and mushrooms to make smoky veggie tacos.

 

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Meet the Author

Rachel

Rachel Howard

Rachel is studying to become a registered dietician at UTC. She believes eating real food is the key to a healthy lifestyle, and loves to teach others about nutrition. Rachel enjoys planning healthy and tasty meals and experimenting in the kitchen with new recipes. She likes the challenge of trying to make classic family recipes healthier or learning new cooking techniques.