May
22
Vegucation: Yellow Squash

yellow squash 2

About Yellow Squash

Squash is a general term that encompasses many varieties like acorn, butternut, pumpkin, and even zucchini. Usually squash is separated into either summer or winter squash. Yellow squash is a summer variety, and is the most widely grown squash across the United States. It’s also one of the oldest crops with evidence dating back to 10,000 years ago.

Why is it beneficial?

Yellow squash is a very beneficial vegetable because it’s full of nutrients for very few calories. It has vitamins A and C which are both important for your immune system. It also has vitamins E and B6 which give you energy and healthy skin. Yellow squash has many important minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium, and iron.

When is it in season?yellow squash

You can usually find local yellow squash in Tennessee from June through September. Always try to find organic squash since it is part of the Dirty Dozen.

How long will it keep?

Unwashed, fresh squash will last 3-5 days if kept in the refrigerator. However, nutrition fades the older your vegetables get, so try to eat them as soon as possible.

How do I prepare yellow squash?

Always prep your squash by washing it first. Luckily, squash only takes a few minutes to become tender, so it’s the perfect quick addition to a meal. Here are a few ways to add more squash to your diet:

  • Add squash slices to chicken kebabs and grill.
  • Saute sliced squash with greens of your choice for an easy side dish.
  • Roast sliced squash in the oven with some cherry tomatoes and salmon filets. Top with parmesan.

 

Weekly Fig is a private membership association for local sustainable foods. 

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Meet the Author

Rachel

Rachel Howard

Rachel is studying to become a registered dietician at UTC. She believes eating real food is the key to a healthy lifestyle, and loves to teach others about nutrition. Rachel enjoys planning healthy and tasty meals and experimenting in the kitchen with new recipes. She likes the challenge of trying to make classic family recipes healthier or learning new cooking techniques.